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Thread: Ceriglass: My second review.

  1. #1
    Senior Member CarPro Mexico's Avatar
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    Ceriglass: My second review.

    Hey folks!

    Having used Ceriglass a lot lately, i decided to share some work i had a few days ago.

    Equipment used:
    * Ceriglass 500ml
    * Glass raton pads (3 and 5")
    * Dewalt rotary
    * 32OZ sprayer with water
    * 3M blue painters tape
    * Nylon pad brush
    * CarPro Polyshave decon block
    * CarPro Ech20 at quick detailer ditulion (not pictured)
    * CarPro BOA orange micro fibers (not pictured)
    * Stoners Invisible glass (not pictured)


    This car belongs to my mother in law's. A 2002 Ford Focus Wagon (Estate)wich is used as a daily driver, grocery getter. A 15 year old car wich hasnt seen a proper window cleaning in its entire life!

    I started to decon glass with the Polyshave block, using Ech20 in quick detailer dilution as lubricant. Oddly, not much contaminants where felt, just some tree sap. Windshield was a different tune, baked road grime made it hard to see through, especially on rain.

    Using a macro lens on my DSLR at 1:1 magnification, revealed the baked water marks:

    [/URL]

    Windows where masked to prevent any resiudue to getting into crevices or damaging grommets by the polishing process. I divided the glass in half to reduce the working area size.


    I started working the edges first, using the 3" glass rayon pad. I can't stress how important and how a big deal is to use these specific pads to get the job done, as i have used other brands and they simply dont stack up!

    Starting at 600RPMs to distribute Ceriglass over the working area, up to 1000, 1400 RPMs max to get the abrasives working until product starts to dry. One fine water mist reactivates the product, making it very economical and achieving a LONG working cycle. Side windows were a breeze!

    It is VERY important to remove any spent product from your pad to avoid saturating the pad and having it clean for proper correction.

    Removing excess product and inspecting the surface, revealed the next results, carried along the whole car:



    Hope i didnt bored you with such a long post, but this has become one of the most used products for me, surpassing and consistently delivering awesome results in anyway, even removing fine scratches before, as seen in my previous take on the very same product:

    https://carproforum.com/showthread.ph...rPro-Ceriglass

    Must say, working with a rotary GREATLY reduces working time.

    Greetings everybody!

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  3. #2
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    Great write up. I have used it before with the same remarkable results.

    Sent from my LGMS550 using Tapatalk

  4. #3
    Certified CarPro Product "Guru" & Senior Member fdresq4's Avatar
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    Not boring at all...Thank you for sharing! Great work..
    Steve



    It's a Ruff life!

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  5. #4
    Senior Member DARK HORSE's Avatar
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    Very nice review and very nice work! Thank you for taking the time to do it!
    Tad
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  6. #5
    Junior Member ThorsteinnEinars's Avatar
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    Great review!

    Few wonderings though:

    1) What would be the main difference if you would skip the polyshave step and just directly started polishing with CeriGlass? Is it about keeping your pad clean while working the product?

    2) Is a rotary polisher more preferred rather than DA when it comes to glass polishing?

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

  7. #6
    Senior Member CarPro Mexico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccflgearhead View Post
    Great write up. I have used it before with the same remarkable results.

    Sent from my LGMS550 using Tapatalk
    Thanks! it really works great.

    Quote Originally Posted by fdresq4 View Post
    Not boring at all...Thank you for sharing! Great work..
    Thanks for you kind words!

    Quote Originally Posted by DARK HORSE View Post
    Very nice review and very nice work! Thank you for taking the time to do it!
    Appreciate it!

    Quote Originally Posted by ThorsteinnEinars View Post
    Great review!

    Few wonderings though:

    1) What would be the main difference if you would skip the polyshave step and just directly started polishing with CeriGlass? Is it about keeping your pad clean while working the product?

    2) Is a rotary polisher more preferred rather than DA when it comes to glass polishing?

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
    Thanks!

    1) Its a "safety step" to prevent any cross contaminantion from the glass to the rayon pad. It can cause marring and adittional scratches.

    Doesnt take much time and ensures a clean area to work with.

    2) For me, it does! i have used Ceriglas before with orbital polishers (Porter Cable and Rupes 21. Both will acieve great results, i just work faster with a rotary on both glass and paint. Changing from 5 to 3 inches pad/backing plate is a breeze on the Dewalt too!
    Official CarPro Retailer for Mexico

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  8. #7
    Junior Member ThorsteinnEinars's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarPro Mexico View Post
    Thanks! it really works great.



    Thanks for you kind words!



    Appreciate it!



    Thanks!

    1) Its a "safety step" to prevent any cross contaminantion from the glass to the rayon pad. It can cause marring and adittional scratches.

    Doesnt take much time and ensures a clean area to work with.

    2) For me, it does! i have used Ceriglas before with orbital polishers (Porter Cable and Rupes 21. Both will acieve great results, i just work faster with a rotary on both glass and paint. Changing from 5 to 3 inches pad/backing plate is a breeze on the Dewalt too!
    Yeah makes sense! I think I'll skip my DA this time and try rotary then. I've got two pneumatic rotary machines, one spins 2500rpm and the other 4500rpm.

    Do anyone know how much there is to worry about heat when it comes to glass polishing vs. paint polishing? Is glass similar to metal when it comes to heat conduction? Would the 4500rpm rotary be ok?

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

  9. #8
    Senior Member CarPro Mexico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThorsteinnEinars View Post
    Yeah makes sense! I think I'll skip my DA this time and try rotary then. I've got two pneumatic rotary machines, one spins 2500rpm and the other 4500rpm.

    Do anyone know how much there is to worry about heat when it comes to glass polishing vs. paint polishing? Is glass similar to metal when it comes to heat conduction? Would the 4500rpm rotary be ok?

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
    Glass is harder than metal, and it conducts heat way better too!

    The thing to Ceriglass is keeping the surface as cool as possible and working safe, in small areas.

    Spraying water to avoid Ceriglass to dry is a must and helps keep temperatures down. Still wouldnt go above 1400RMPS on a rotary tho.
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  10. #9
    Junior Member ThorsteinnEinars's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarPro Mexico View Post
    Glass is harder than metal, and it conducts heat way better too!

    The thing to Ceriglass is keeping the surface as cool as possible and working safe, in small areas.

    Spraying water to avoid Ceriglass to dry is a must and helps keep temperatures down. Still wouldnt go above 1400RMPS on a rotary tho.
    Okay woah! Then the 4500rpm is not a way to go haha!

    I like to work with large sections. Why is it preferred to work in small sections when it comes to glass polishing? Does more heat maybe get things working faster?

    Same wondering for paintwork now when polishing.. when the paint starts to heat up, will that make things work faster?

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

  11. #10
    Senior Member CarPro Mexico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThorsteinnEinars View Post
    Okay woah! Then the 4500rpm is not a way to go haha!

    I like to work with large sections. Why is it preferred to work in small sections when it comes to glass polishing? Does more heat maybe get things working faster?

    Same wondering for paintwork now when polishing.. when the paint starts to heat up, will that make things work faster?

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
    I prefer to divide my working area into small sections because its easier to check progress, i use only the amount of compound/polish/LSP needed (no waste)and its plain easier both fisically and mentally, but its only personal preference.

    Heat will always be present and its something to take into account. Its needed for the abrasives to start doing its work, but should be avoided when working near body edges or working over the same area at high machine RPMs/OPMs. You dont want to have the polisher running at high speeds over the same area for long.

    Depending on your polisher and pad/compund/polish combo, it takes little time for the abrasives to heat. Usually you start at low speeds to achieve this, stepping/decreasing your speed as needed to finish the work. Its technique dependant tho.

    Hope that helps!
    Last edited by CarPro Mexico; 04-18-2017 at 05:54 PM.
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