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Thread: Reusing product bottle as water bottle

  1. #1
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    Question Reusing product bottle as water bottle

    I just finished a 500ml bottle of Perl, removed the label and gave the bottle multiple washes. There’s no scent of Perl left.

    Is it safe to use as a drinking water bottle?

  2. #2
    Senior Member The Guz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keiron.r View Post
    Is it safe to use as a drinking water bottle?
    Lol why. This is a spam post.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Guz View Post
    Lol why. This is a spam post.
    No, I just really like the look and feel of the bare bottle.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rsurfer View Post
    I would use a BPA free plastic bottle to drink from.
    Thanks, might start using them as a vase or other decorations.

  5. #5
    I love shiny things Merlin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keiron.r View Post
    ...There’s no scent of Perl left. Is it safe to use as a drinking water bottle?
    Personally, I would not but that's me.

  6. #6
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    so, I saw this comment about BPA and I wanna clarify some things

    BPA (bisphenol A) is a chemical that is added to many commercial products, including food containers and hygiene products. These days, BPA-containing plastics are commonly used in food containers, baby bottles, and other items.
    BPA is also used to make epoxy resins, which are spread on the inner lining of canned food containers to keep the metal from corroding and breaking. It’s worth noting that many BPA-free products have merely replaced BPA with bisphenol-S (BPS) or bisphenol-F (BPF).

    However, even small concentrations of BPS and BPF may disrupt the function of your cells in a way similar to BPA. Thus, BPA-free bottles may not be an adequate solution. Plastic items labeled with the recycling numbers 3 and 7 or the letters “PC” likely contain BPA, BPS, or BPF.

    Many experts claim that BPA is harmful — but others disagree.
    This section explains what BPA does in the body and why its health effects remain controversial.
    BPA is said to mimic the structure and function of the hormone estrogen.

    Due to its estrogen-like shape, BPA can bind to estrogen receptors and influence bodily processes, such as growth, cell repair, fetal development, energy levels, and reproduction.

    In addition, BPA may also interact with other hormone receptors, such as those for your thyroid, thus altering their function.

    Your body is sensitive to changes in hormone levels, which is the reason why BPA’s ability to mimic estrogen is believed to affect your health.

    BPA may affect several aspects of your fertility.

    One study observed that women with frequent miscarriages had about three times as much BPA in their blood as women with successful pregnancies.

    What’s more, studies of women undergoing fertility treatments showed that those with higher levels of BPA have proportionally lower egg production and are up to two times less likely to become pregnant.


    In light of the evidence, it’s best to take steps to limit your BPA exposure and other potential food toxins. From my personal experience, I started with BPA free coffee makers.

    In particular, pregnant women may benefit from avoiding BPA — especially during the early stages of pregnancy.

    As for others, occasionally drinking from a “PC” plastic bottle or eating from a can is probably not a reason to panic.

    That said, swapping plastic containers for BPA-free ones requires very little effort for a potentially big health impact.

    If you aim to eat fresh, whole foods, you’ll automatically limit your BPA exposure.

    Source: healthline.com/nutrition/what-is-bpa#bottom-line

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